New house architectural designs by David Minch. Well thought out and planned around their existing environments, David’s new house designs enhance the unique attributes of your special property. Your vision combined with the experience of one of New York’s most thoughtful architects for an inspiring home.

Arts and Crafts House based on Birdcliffs Woodstock

New house design based on Birdcliff Cottages of Woodstock

New house design based on Birdcliff Cottages of Woodstock

Efficient, economical and just the right size. This home, based on the Arts and Crafts style of the Birdcliff cottages in Woodstock, was designed for a local builder. It is a simple rectangle with economical plywood board-and-batten siding, has two bedrooms and a (multi-use room), and is only 1400 sq.ft. A well thought out open plan makes this a good example of the less-is-more movement in home design. Last year was the first time in 75 years that the average home built in our country decreased in size. Home buyers are understanding that quality is more important than additional square footage. Within the current economic crunch and tight-money environment, it is possible to build a great house if careful design decisions are made. Energy efficiency is one benefit of the small house. Combine this with 21st century insulation and appropriate (shell tightening) and your life in this home would be sustainable for years to come.

New House Design With Catskill Mountain Views

New House Design With Mountain Views

Catskill Mountain Views And Energy Efficient Design

Traditional home design in natural setting

Traditional home design in natural setting

Beautiful Catskill mountain views from an energy-efficient house design thoughtfully built on a smart site plan.

The design of this home for Jim Graf grew from the spectacular vistas. The dining/kitchen and the living room on the first floor, and two bedrooms and a playroom upstairs all take advantage of the north oriented views.

Mountain Views And Energy Efficient Design

Mountain Views And Energy Efficient Design

Less prominent rooms, bathrooms, utility rooms and circulation are located to the south in the plan. The rectangular plan is simple to build while the Craftsman style details make this an attractive home. Jim built this home for himself and the quality is second to none. Glass on the north side of a building receives almost no solar gain and therefore looses more heat annually than south-facing glass which has an annual heat gain.

Its size is so carefully chosen to balance between heat loss and appreciation of the views.

It is especially critical to appropriately (shell-tighten) homes exposed to the higher winds of mountain settings since infiltration of cold air increases as the average wind increases. The sloped ceilings and dormers of second floors can create serious infiltration problems and it takes expertise to contain energy losses, maintaining comfort and insure against condensation and moisture.

House design on the Chesapeake Bay

New home designed on Chesapeake Bay

New home designed on Chesapeake Bay

Unpretentious home design on Chesapeake Bay

Unpretentious home design on Chesapeake Bay

Beach front house staircase

Beach front house staircase

This home was designed for a spectacular site at the end of a 3/4 mile spit into the Chesapeake Bay.  Building in sand, intense summer solar heat from the east and west, and the owner’s request for a cabin rather than the typical “McMansion”, were the main criteria.  Large shading overhangs, deep porches to both the east and west, and a simple rectangular roof plan and tall pilings, are the responses to these criteria.  There is one large great room with porches, decks and entrance stairs, while to the back are three bedrooms and a bath.  The floor plan jogs in and out as needed, but the simple rectangular roof really defines the unpretentious style of the home.

Sweeping meadow is inspiration for new home

Natural Landscape Inspires New Home Design

A sweeping meadow was the canvas which my client had purchased for his new home. How to work with a site is an early decision in the architectural design process.  One of the “patterns” in Christopher Alexander’s “A Pattern Language” recommends that the best parts of the land be maintained;  in this case the meadow was left open. With that in mind, I [and my client] reviewed many ways to place the house to work within the surrounding environment.

[youtube https://youtu.be/UWCZUly2_2k]